Friday, April 13, 2018

AHA approved egg!

One of the full size chickens miss-fired yesterday and produced this minute egg:

















I was pretty sure this would be an AHA approved egg. Zero fat. Zero cholesterol. Tiny amount of protein. You don't have to include the eggshell (unless you feel a calcium supplement is a good idea. Could treat your acid reflux at the same time!).


















Of course it should be fried in corn oil. Still hungry?

Fill up on sugar!

Ah, the decades of stupidity that have now been mostly overturned. Just the corn oil to get rid of.

Peter

16 comments:

ctviggen said...

Have you tried Quail eggs? Supposedly, they have some good properties, if eaten mainly raw. They have them at a local store, and I bought a tray of them. They're tiny! You need to eat the entire tray to get anything. They also are tough to crack, as they have a film in them that holds the shell together.

cavenewt said...

When I was a kid we had a flock of chickens. Once, on the same day, we got both a tiny yolkless egg and a huge 4.5-inch egg* with three yolks. I always thought the one chicken stole the yolk from the other chicken. The big egg made the local newspaper.

* 11.4 cm for you metric types

cavenewt said...

Dang. Forgot to subscribe again. Wish it was on by default.

Passthecream said...

Maybe quail could be 'appartment chickens', free range on the carpet ...

You might benefit from an egg perforator. These put a tiny hole in the blunt end of an egg without perforating the membrane so you can steam them nicely, steam goes through the hole, makes the shells come off fresh eggs more easily.

Peter said...

The eggs I'm a complete convert to are Bantam eggs. I was down on them to begin with... What's the point of something that small? But they are all yolk! In the pan you can't tell which came from a Cuckoo Marran and which was a bantam. But you're feeding maintenance to 4kg of Cuckoo vs just over a kilo of Bantie, for the same yolk. Pity the Banties are so crazy!

Peter

Spittin'chips said...

Many studies conducted by real scientists conclude that, pound for pound, Bantams are more atherogenic than other chickens. Small,dense and, yes, a little bit nuts.

Peter said...

Must be good!

Passthecream said...

Peter, is your butter made from running tigers which have melted?

Going from the sublime to the ridiculous, I'm a big fan of duck and goose eggs.

ZoomZoom said...

My 1/2 bantam normally lays jumbo sized eggs, every once in a while she will put out a fairy egg like yours, no larger than a quails.

Bob said...

Peter,

Passthecream reminded me of a question.

Sometime ago, you wrote about using an "oral protein tolerance test" as a test for diabetes in a low-carber. How much protein would you use? Would egg whites be a good choice for the test?

I'm inclined to think the whites from a couple of goose eggs would be plenty. Thanks.

Eric said...

My daughter keeps Quail, meaning she gets to do the fun stuff and we have to remind her to do the tedious things or do them ourselves. They are quite smart and active, so I wouldn't recommend keeping them in an apartment. The eggs are nice but a bit of hassle to peel.

So do Bantam chicken lay regluar sized eggs or just a regular sized yolk? If just the yolk, doesn't the developing fetus need the white also?

And if large eggs, how do they physically manage this? SIL is a vet of the kind who supervises farms, food producers and restaurants. She said not to buy XL eggs as they are from specially bred hens but it still hurts them. On the other hand, our local organic farmer has mobile hens (i.e. hen house on wheels so the hens always have a fresh meadow) and shes says the eggs simply get larger as the hens get older.

Peter said...

Hi Bob, I've never done it, you'd have to find a DM T1 person to try it out for you. My canine patients would be markedly hyperglycaemic on 1g/kg of meat. I'd expect the degree to coincide with the dose. It would be interesting to see what the 20g/meal of Dr Bernstein presented if not covered by insulin.

Eric, an interesting question. The bantam eggs are small with red chicken sized yolks. Does that mean some of the K+, albumin and water is in the yolk? Not tried checking that on any sort of data base...

Peter

Peter said...

That would be 1g DM protein from meat...

Eric said...

Red Yolks? Wow. Are these Bantam Bantam or a Bantam variety of another race?

And what do you mean by crazy?

Daughter would probably like to swap in small chickens if any of the quayle die, but I am not sure they will happily coexist.

Peter said...

Eric, no. Typed too quickly! The size of a Rhode Island Red commercial chicken egg yolk, rather than the colour of the yolk! Our Bantams have been modestly tameable but are much closer to wild birds than the ex-batts. Unless you handle them every day they behave as if you are Death incarnate. They can be tamed, but it's not easy. The ex batts usually love people. The Vourvarks are crazy too and the Cream Legbars are a bit banatmy too. The Barnvetlers are docile but big, with tiny eggs as they are very young still... We only have one wannabe house-chicken but that's limited to conservatory/windowsills, it's a Red as you might guess.

Peter

Eric said...

Peter, took me a few moments to figure out that ex-batt means ex battery.

Our first "batch" of five quayle hens were all different in character, but all reasonably tame. One was very curious and tame but died early unfortunately. The second most tame one then became the tame one and will sit on daughter's shoulder or have her carry her around the garden, sitting in a pocket. The second batch of three were from the same breeder, same color but slightly heavier. They were nearly feral and took a long time to become friends with the three that remained from the first batch but are still quite difficult to catch and handle.

One of the new ones died yesterday. Since I have the chance to ask a real vet: is it normal for the breastbone to be sticking out by nearly half an inch over a length of about an inch and a half? I don't think the other two that died last year had that kind of problem, and one can hardly feel the breast bone on a life quayle.

Based on our statistics so far, I am inclined to say that quayle either live 6 +/- 2 months or forever...